Seek Clarity Of Purpose In Your Translated Works

Communication and translation for international business thrives on efficiency and clarity of purpose. Pompous, inflated prose is inefficient and often confuses your purpose. When working for a Houston Portuguese Translation company, don’t try to impress people with a big vocabulary. Use language that everyone can understand.

Among novice Indianapolis Spanish Translation workers, problems with inflated diction, pompous prose and flabby expressions aren’t unique to the twentieth century. Such problems have a long history. Aristotle stresses “a good style is first of all clear. The proof is that language which does not convey a clear meaning fails to perform the very function of language.” Aristotle’s common sense, unfortunately, has often been ignored in favor of affected, artificial language.

By the twentieth century, some writing had become so obscure that many of the brightest people of the time denounced verbal excesses. Francis Bacon, for instance, condemned obscure communication as “the first disease of learning”. John Locke, in his Essay Concerning Human Understanding, argued that language has three ends that include:

1. To convey ideas or beliefs to someone else
2. To convey these ideas or beliefs with as much simplicity and speed as feasible
3. To communicate the language of items: “Language is either misused or lacking in the event it neglects one of these three.”

In short, for roughly the past 2400 years, scholars and rhetoricians and Atlanta French Translation workers have stressed the need for clear communications.  The difference between clear and obscure language can be compared to the difference between backpacking and camping in a luxury camper. A backpacker carries everything that’s necessary; as backpackers know; you can be comfortable and see so much more. With a luxury camper, you carry so many unnecessary items that it takes two days to pack-and two days to unpack. You’re stuck in a crowded campground and so weighed down with gadgets (from lawn chairs to televisions and mountain bikes) that moving to a campsite 100 feet away become a major task. You never get to see the sunset from your own private mountain lake or hear the loons calling to one another.

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