Planning Your Global Marketing Research Project: What To Do Before You Get Started

Planning is the key developing useful reports for global managers. These guidelines were prepared by a French translator in Baltimore who focuses on international research and will help assist other translators in planning and focusing their research studies.

Choice of Topic

In most cases a certified translator will be asked to assist another researcher in locating, gathering and translating information about a specific business issue. There are times when a client may also come to you directly with a series of questions and asked you to conduct web and literature searches that will help answer the questions.  If the data that you gather is good and the research report is well written and documented, you be asked to complete additional projects with greater responsibilities. Companies that operate on a global basis are full of research problems to solve, hypotheses to be formed and strategies to implement. This is why every language translator must ensure that their report makes a valuable contribution.

Focus of Topic

Before you start the project, you should meet with the client and narrow your scope so you can discuss purpose completely with the targeted readers. To achieve a clear direction, always phrase your topic as a question. Assume, for instance, that you are provide Portuguese Translation in Houston and have been tasked to research certain needs of local businesses in Rwanda. You have to focus on a specific need you can research thoroughly. Let’s say you have a client which is a large petroleum company and interested in improving their public relations with the local community and area businesses. After some hard thinking, you decide on this question: How can XYZ Company improve their reputation and goodwill among the local people of Rwanda? Your audience will be your client.

Working Bibliography

When you have selected and narrowed your topic, be sure you can find adequate resources online, in your library, or various trade associations. Do your bibliography early to avoid choosing a subject and an approach only to learn later that not enough sources are available. You might in fact choose and focus your topic on the basis of a preliminary search for primary and secondary sources.

Conduct a quick search of the Internet, reference guides and government publications. Using a separate note card for each work, record the bibliographic information. Many internet sites and books will contain bibliographies that lead you to additional sources. With a current topic, such as alternative energy projects in developing countries, you might expect to find most of your information in recent magazine, journal, and newspaper articles. Your bibliography, of course, will grow as you read. Assess possible interview sources and include probable interviews in your working bibliography.

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