The Body And Conclusion of the Global Research Report

Body

The body is the meat of the global research report.  As a French translator at a Raleigh translation services indicated, this is where translators will describe something, analyzing something, or giving instructions, the data in this section support and clarify your statement of purpose, your conclusion, and any recommendations. “Show me” is the implied demand any reader will make of your report. Your body section should deliver a step-by-step view of the process by which you move from introduction to conclusion. Any interpretations or recommendations will be only as credible as the evidence that supports them.

For good practice, Dallas Translation Services workers should name the body section something that reflects the intended purpose of the report. For example, if your report is a physical description of an item, you might title the body section “Description and Function of Parts.” The same section in a set of instructions might be titled “Instructions for Performance,” or “Collected Data” in a report that analyzes a problem or answers a question.

Conclusion

The conclusion of your report shouldn’t provide any new facts. The purpose of the conclusion should be to review and clarify and information contained in the body. A French Translator in New York offers the following subsections that are most often used.  However, one should remember that the subsections can vary depending on the specifics related to your report.  In a report describing an overseas competitor, a conclusion should review and summarize the major parts of the body and briefly describe the purpose of the conclusion.

l. Summary of information in the body. When your discussion is several pages long, summarize it.

2. Comprehensive interpretation of information in the body. Tie your report together with an overall interpretation of data, and conclusions based on facts.

3. Recommendations and proposals based on information in the body. Base recommendations or proposals directly on your conclusions.

Although a good beginning, middle, and ending are indispensable, feel free to modify, expand, or delete any subsections as you see fit.

GATHERING INFORMATION

Begin your research with a general review of your topic. Then move from general to specific. Encyclopedias are a good place to begin, because they contain general information. Or read a book or pamphlet that offers a comprehensive view of your subject before moving to specialized articles in periodicals. Since Lynne’s report  concerns professional communication, she went to such journals as The Journal of Business Communication and The American Business Communication Bulletin for her information.

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