A Summary For Translators And Writers Of Proposals

Before concluding this section on proposals, we thought we would provide a summary of the posts that we have made on this subject.  To start, most Washington D.C. translation workers define a proposal as an offer to do something or a suggestion for some action. Among the various types of proposals that can be generated, there are three main types that consist of the planning proposal, the research proposal, and the sales proposal. Among these various types, they can take the form of an internal proposal, an external proposal, a solicited proposal or an unsolicited proposal.

A Houston Portuguese Translation profession explains the differences between the three main types of proposal using the following clarification.  A planning proposal is typically written and translated to address the benefits of following a suggestion for change.  Alternatively, a research proposal tends to explain why a research project would be valuable to an organization.  In doing so, the research proposal must explain why the researcher is qualified to carry out the project and identify the likelihood of its success.  Finally, the sales proposal should be written to explain why your client can do a better job at fulfilling the needs of the customer better than a competitor.  Regardless of the type of proposal, a well written one will answer the necessary questions concerning what, why, how, when, and how much.

To ensure a good proposal, several professional Atlanta translation workers offer the following suggestion:

l. Use the appropriate format and supplements.
2. Be sure that your subject is focused and your purpose worthwhile.
3. Identify all related problems.
4. Offer realistic methods.
5. Provide concrete and specific information.
6. Use visuals whenever possible.
7. Maintain the appropriate level of technicality.
8. Create a tone that connects with your readers.

As you plan to write your proposal, work from a detailed outline that has a distinct introduction, body, and conclusion:

I. In the introduction, answer the what and why and clarify the subject, background, and purpose of your proposal. Establish need and benefits, along with your qualifications. Identify data sources, any limitations of your plan, and its scope.
2. In the body, answer the how, when, and how much. Spell out your plan by enumerating methods, work schedules, materials and equipment, personnel, facilities, costs, expected results, and feasibility.
3. In the conclusion, summarize key points and stimulate action.

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