The Information Revolution

Most people are repeatedly reminded that the industrial revolution is dead, displaced by computers, mobile electronics, the internet and the information revolution. That opinion is reinforced by eye-raising figures. In I980, Dallas translation services workers found that standard production made up less than twenty-five percent of the U.S. gross national product; white-collar service industries made up the remainder. Between I982 and I987, those white-collar workers took home more than $5 trillion in salaries-essentially for producing, interpreting, controlling, or distributing information and facts. By I990, nearly all U.S. busnesses were dependent on computers.

Powered by a billion-dollar computer electronics and software industry, the information revolution is substantially improving job efficiency. Apart from having the capability to produce, interpret, respond to, and distribute information and facts more quickly, a Chinese translator in San Jose has found that modern day executives can generate much more knowledgeable conclusions and supply far better service simply because they can get and act on information quickly. As little as a decade ago, Company X might have needed at least two or three weeks to propose and deliver a bid for its product or service. Now that same company can get the latest prices right away, draw up a proposal, calculate various costs by feeding information into a software program designed specifically for that purpose (i.e., an electronic spread sheet), revise the bid proposal, then print and mail it electronically – all within two or three days.

In addition to changing the way businesses function, the information revolution has had an enormous impact on the world at large. Portland translators have found that we’ve become information addicts. Cooks use computers to file and find their recipes quickly and to place orders for supplies. Birdwatchers use them to record and inform others of their sightings.  Children use them for games and homework. Our cars speak to us, advising us that we’re low on gas or reminding us to turn off the lights. These are just a few examples of how computers enable us to process information rapidly.

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