How Translators Should Use The Power Of Persuasion By Including Facts And Data

As content creators, writers and translators who are trying to include persuasion in our works, it’s important to keep in mind that the people who will be reading the material can be classified into groups.  They include those who have been persuaded, those who can be persuaded and those who cannot be persuaded.  Therefore, Washington D.C. Legal Translation providers suggest that we should be cautious about how we use persuasion to sway the group that can be persuaded and be delicate in how we address those who are already persuaded.  You will never be able to change the mindset of those who cannot be persuaded.  As far as those who are already persuaded, it might be enough to demonstrate why you are a reliable source of information and then make your emotional appeal.  For those who can be persuaded, you need to present proof and data to support your position.

In a commercial sales presentation, one sales representative might state a negative claim against the competition to persuade the key decision makers that the product they offer is inferior.  A Portuguese Miami translator  translator suggests that the back and forth debate might sound something like this:

• Brand X’s product lacks the software scalability to address your needs in six months.

• Brand Y’s product has one of the worst support teams in the world.

• Brand X’s product has a tendency to crash because it is new and hasn’t been adequately field tested.

On the other hand, a positive argument is one that reinforces the person making the claim with encouraging statements.

• The product line we represent has been field tested in thousands of installations.

• With the software that operates on our computers, you can expect efficiency gains of 20%.

It’s likely that there won’t be many members in your audience who will feel that you are trying to deceive them by offering incorrect data. More likely than not, Seattle French translation workers suggest that the facts won’t concern the audience as much as matters they relate to value, importance, and the possible fallout from making a bad decision. The largest part of your presentation should be devoted to clarifying the implications and meanings of the material you presented. In other words, as your audience takes in all of the information that you presented, they will want to know what it all means and why it is important to them.

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