Learning About the Job Market For Translation Workers

Once you have performed some background research and produced a comprehensive account of your competencies, aptitudes, concerns, and needs and wants, start learning about your career choices. In order to know how to respond to job trends, Detroit Chinese translation workers suggest that you start your hunt early. Make an effort by paying attention to these recommendations:

1. Starting in your sophomore year, start browsing the local and online job boards: many local newspapers still publish Help Wanted sections in their Sunday editions. Listed here will be job descriptions, wages, and requirements for many work opportunities.

2. Talk to a librarian and ask her to recommend occupational outlooks, industry or trade publications, websites, and magazines or journals in your discipline.

3. Go to your university’s career and placement office; job postings are listed there, interviews are planned, and advisers can offer useful tips regarding job hunting.

4. Contact individuals in your line of business to get an inside view and some useful guidance.

5. Register in your career and placement office for job interviews with business representatives who have announced campus visits.

6. Request the recommendations of professors who do professional consulting or who have worked in business, industry, or government.

7. Be on the lookout for an internship in your discipline; this experience may count more than your education.

8. Develop connections; avoid being scared to ask for guidance. Write down names, titles, phone numbers, e-mail addresses, and addresses of individuals ready to assist you.

9. A lot of professional organizations offer student memberships at reduced fees. These types of organizations can produce outstanding contacts and look good on your resume. If you do join a professional organization, try to attend meetings of the local chapter.

By following these recommendations before you graduate and begin your job search, you might discover particular classes cause you to be more valuable to prospective employers. In numerous jobs, for instance such as in the professional certified translation field, a solid understanding of layout and design applications is attractive, particular human resources positions call for counseling experience, and so on. Master as many skills as possible and customize your last semester to these mastering these demands (enrolling in a few layout and design application classes, taking a few counseling classes and performing volunteer work for a non-government agency (NGO).

If you happen to be transitioning from one job to another or one career to another, prospective hiring managers will be more intrigued in what you’ve done in your years since graduation. Be ready to present the way your experience is applicable to the new German translator job. Take advantage of the contacts you have built over time.

Evaluating Your Skills and Aptitudes As A Translator

As an aspiring language translator who is beginning their job search, you should begin by evaluating your talents and aptitudes. The following questions were developed by a certified translation company in Houston, Texas. By answering these questions, you will more fully understand the value you offer to prospective employers.

  1. What are the skills have I learned through my education?
  2. What expertise have I gained as a result of holding my part-time and full-time jobs?
  3. What knowledge have I attained from my pastimes and other passions?

At this stage in your self-assessment, most hiring authorities in German translation agencies recommend that you not leave out any talent you possess, irrespective of how insignificant it might seem as it corresponds to the position you are seeking. As soon as you have documented all your abilities, focus on your genuine skills and abilities):

  1. What do I get pleasure in doing?
  2. What classes did I like most in college? Why?
  3. Which courses came easiest to me? Why?
  4. Do I possess leadership skills? What evidence can I present?
  5. Do I perform effectively in teams and when working with other people?
  6. Do I have strong skills in analyzing problems that include breaking down situations into smaller components and evaluating interrelationships?
  7. Am I particularly strong at identifying connections and interrelationships among ideas)?
  8. Am I ambitious and self-motivated to achieve results?
  9. How well do I speak other languages other than English?
  10. Do I play an instrument?
  11. Am I artistic and creative with skills in drawing and painting?
  12. Can I read in other languages with strong understanding?
  13. Do I write and speak fluently in other languages?
  14. Am I a good listener?
  15. Am I a creative problem solver and do people turn to me regularly for ideas?
  16. Do I work effectively with other people?
  17. Am I able to decipher data correctly?
  18. How strong am I in locating and using primary data sources for research?
  19. Do I interact well with other people and appear receptive to their ideas?
  20. What extracurricular functions have I been particularly strong in doing?
  21. What additional skills do I offer that will benefit a prospective employer?

Besides helping you concentrate on finding the right career, these questions will be helpful when you compose your resume and get ready for interviews.  For more information, please visit the translation resources page at Indiana University.

Job Prospecting & Resume Strategies For Translators

As a translation services professional, your resume is an overview of your history, credentials, expertise and proficiencies. A resume generally offers background information to reinforce your application letter. Your application letter, therefore, highlights particular aspects of your resume and demonstrates the way your track record finely suited to the job opening.

Given the weak economy and the plethora of college graduates, the employment market is a buyer’s market, with countless numbers of candidates contending for a small handful of positions. The truth is that a lot of large corporations are sent over 400,000 resumes a year for as few as 1000 open position. No matter if you happen to be seeking your first job or changing careers, you must conduct an extremely successful promotional strategy. In order to be competitive and hold an advantage over thousands of other candidates, you need to promote your capabilities better than your competitors.

JOB PROSPECTING: THE PRELIMINARY STEPS

A university diploma is no guarantee that you will be given the position that you desire, the geographic area you want, or the income you believe you’re entitled to receive. With intelligent planning, however, prior to composing your resume and letter of application it is possible to strengthen your odds. One strategy that is being used by job candidates is having their college transcripts translated along with their resumes.  If you perform the task of seeking work methodically, you may make the act of “looking for” and “getting the” position you desire less like playing the lottery.

Why Assess Your Abilities?

Prior to starting your search for employment, assess your abilities, passions, aptitudes, and desires. According to Houston Chinese Translation workers, the primary reason for worker discontentment stems from people disliking their jobs. If you don’t plan cautiously, you might become another statistic, one more disappointed employee performing tasks that you dislike.

Tips For Writing An Excellent Research Report

Formal reports offer solutions, answer questions and solve problems. The practice of data analysis entails the careful collection and evaluation of facts that you gather from various sources and use as evidence to formulate judgments and produce solutions. During the course of planning your report, Atlanta German translation workers suggest that you spend times thinking about which of these questions your analysis is meant to answer:

l. Will taking a specific action reach a specific objective?

2. Is solution A or solution B a better cure for a certain condition?

3. What causes a certain condition to occur?

4. Is a given solution useful in a particular scenario?

Shorten your strategy for answering a research question and recast it as a declarative sentence in your statement of purpose. Occasionally you will work with a combination of approaches.

Once the research problem or question is defined, the next step is to analyze the facts without bias so that legitimate conclusions are made. At every phase of the project, Portland Spanish translation workers suggest that researchers give special consideration regarding the type of information record, what to leave out, what to discard and what you need next.

While you sort through information and create your report, only use the most reputable and reliable resources, differentiate hard from soft facts, and avoid specious reasoning. Adhere to these techniques as you plan and write your report:

l. Keep these questions with you and refer back to them at numerous points in your study.

a. What am I specifically seeking?

b. How should I structure my research questions to acquire the data that I need?

c. What is the best approach to communicate my results to the target audience?

Stay adaptable enough to adjust your style as you progress in your study.

2. Create a thorough outline and produce your report from it.

a. In your introduction, describe the topic of the report, explain and identify the research problem or question, and summarize important historical information. Determine your target audience, and briefly go over the sources and reasons for excluding data. Include working definitions or include them in a glossary. If you create a glossary or appendices, discuss its existence. Lastly, mention all significant issues to be covered in your body.

b. In the body section of the report, separate your subject into major topics and related subtopics. As recommended by Milwaukee translation workers, you should continue to split up the topic as much as possible in order to keep the topic easy to understand. In every stage of division, specify the topic, mention your relevant results, and assess and decipher the findings.

c. In the conclusion, review the most significant results from the body section, clarify the meaning of your results, and make recommendations according to your findings.

Parts of A Report

Introduction. The introduction explains and states the problem or condition, and offers background information. Define the target audience and go over your sources of information, in addition to your purpose for not including particular information such as expert opinions and relevant data. Dallas Chinese translation workers recommend  that you state working definitions, except in cases where there are so many that a glossary is required. In case you use a glossary and appendices, refer to them in your introduction. Lastly, establish the scope of your report by detailing the important concepts covered in the body.

Body. The body separates an elaborate issue into connected topics and subtopics, positioned in order of their significance. Break up the subject into its key components and then the key components into into subparts. Several New York French translation workers suggest that authors continue to break up the subject matter in order to simplify it and make sense of the topic. For example, if your major topic is “Common Problems Reported In New Automobiles”, you might break this down into a number of subtopics:  “Engine troubles” and “Non Engine troubles”.  The second subtopic can be divided into a number of sub-subtopics including “broken interior components”, “non-working electrical issues” and perhaps even “after sales service”.  These divisions and subdivisions prevent the author from getting off track and assists readers in following the analysis.  It’s critical that based on your logic and analysis that your audience can draw conclusions that are the same as your own. Good research necessitates the inclusion of all feasible issues and reduces the focus from possible to certain causes. Sort, assess, and decipher information to attain a logical conclusion. The course of action could be outlined like the following:

  1. Define and Assess all Feasible Factors, and Reject the Improbable Ones
  2. Choose the Most Likely Reasons and Assess Them
  3. Determine the specific (or Direct Causes)

Conclusion. The conclusion will likely be in the most interesting section for the majority of readers since it provides answers to the questions that the audience had initially. As a result, many reports these days offer the conclusion just after the introduction and body section.

Here you review, decipher, and suggest. Even though you have evaluated information at every stage of your research, your summary brings everything together in a wider understanding and recommends specific strategies. One Kansas City translation worker recommends that the final section be considered in three ways:

  1. The summary must correctly mirror the body of the report.
  2. The general meaning that you present needs to be congruent with the results reported in the summary.
  3. The suggestion needs to be in line with the research purpose, the proof offered, and the explanation provided.

The summary and explanation needs to be intelligently linked to your suggestions.

The Finished Report Depends On A Good Outline

You might outline before or after writing a first draft. In any case, the finished report depends on a good outline. Here is one outline that a San Jose Russian translation services specialist provided that can be adapted to most analytical reports:

I. INTRODUCTION

A. Definition, Explanation, and Background of the Research Question or Problem

B. Intentions of the Report and the Target Audience

C. Sources of Material

D. Glossary of terms

E. Limits of the Research

F. Scope of the Research including subject matter listed in order of importance

 

II. COMPILED DATA

A. Primary Issue Researched

l. Description and Explanation

2. Discoveries and Outcomes

3. Appraisal and summary of the collected data

4. Explanation and Analysis of findings

 

B. Next Issue Researched

l. First Subtopic

a. Description and Explanation

b. Discoveries and Outcomes

c. Appraisal and summary of the collected data

d. Explanation and Analysis of findings

2. Another subtopic

 

Ill. CONCLUSION

A. Summary of Findings

B. Complete Explanation of Findings

C. Recommendations and Proposals (as needed)

This outline is only tentative. Modify it if necessary

Be Flexible When Planning and Writing Your Research Report

In order to ensure your report meets the objectives that you established from the beginning, it’s important that you adhere to a set of guidelines as you move from planning to writing the formal report.

Remain Flexible

While you are searching and locating sources useful in supporting your research objectives, new findings will lead you in different directions depending on what you find at each step in your investigation process.  Because you will be actively writing, updating and changing your report while investigating new potential sources of information, you will want guidelines to keep you focused on answering your research objective.  The following list is a set of questions that one French translator has compiled to help those working on research projects.  Throughout your project, you should look back and review these questions:

  1. What type of information do I need and why do I need it?
  2. How should I phrase my questions to ensure that right information is collected?
  3. How should I structure my presentation to communicate my process of inquiry and my findings?

As a certified translation worker, you should review these questions regularly during your project and you should be aware that your answers to them may change over time.  At the offset, the first question is answered by the research purpose.  The second question will be phrased in each of your research questions and serve as the blueprint for your report.  The third question will be answered by your outline.  During the research process, a respected Seattle German translation worker suggests that you need allow enough flexibility to allow modifications to your plan in case of unanticipated discoveries.

The following are some examples:

  1. Just as you think your research report is nearly finished, you discover new variables that had not been identified in your statement of purpose.  As a result, you now need to adjust your statement of research purpose to include the new variables.
  2. You decide that certain issues that hadn’t been included in you should now be included or learn that critical information on one of research questions is unavailable. As a result, your research plan needs to be reworked.
  3. While composing your initial draft, you determine that the organization is very poor and needs to be restructured. As a result, you come up with a new outline.

Keep in mind that your finished report will be the summation of many decisions and revisions.  Always remain flexible and be prepared to revise and reshuffle as often as necessary.

Avoiding Specious Reasoning

Specious reasoning is misleading since it seems correct at first, but fails to standup to careful analysis.  Thoughts grounded on non-authoritative judgments and random guessing are often considered specious.  Inferences that were developed speciously flop when carefully scrutinized.

Assume, for example, you are Portuguese Translation Manager at a global manufacturing company.  The president of your company has directed you to evaluate the reliability of pre-employment evaluation testing of workers in Portugal and Brazil as a measure of intellect and as an indicator of future employee success. Going over the evidence that you gathered, you discover a strong positive correlation between below average pre-employment evaluation scores and low achievers. After doing so, you substantiate your findings by evaluating and analyzing a solid cross section of trustworthy information sources. Once you substantiate your findings, you determine that you are prepared to conclude that pre-employment evaluation tests are reliable measures of intelligence and predict future employee performance. Unfortunately, your analysis would be misleading unless you could show that:

  1. Only candidates for jobs having a high potential for promotion were given pre-employment tests
  2. Candidates in Portugal and Brazil had later been exposed to the exact same training curriculum at a similar pace.

It’s important for translation services workers to understand that even hard facts are sometimes used to support faulty reasoning.  The data that is gathered must be interpreted correctly, objectively, and within a context that accounts for unforeseen variables.

Locating, Assessing, And Deciphering Information

The process of researching your subject matter is only a small portion of your task. As you organize information that you collect, you need to be able to assess the trustworthiness of your information along with deciphering it. An data that you use outside of the material that it was used to substantiate, can be viewed in a variety of ways, however, translation services workers are expected to use the most reliable information in the most honest method possible. To guarantee the trustworthiness of your analysis, always use the most credible sources, separate the most credible findings from those that are somewhat less credible, and steer clear of any misleading information even if it seems like it could have some truth.

Choose Reliable Sources

Ensure that all of the sources you use are reliable, trustworthy, unbiased, and well-respected. As a certified Houston Translation worker who is hired by a local petroleum exploration and drilling company, think about how a specific Russian manufacturer of offshore rig equipment would best meet your company’s needs. You might expect reviews in a reputable online forum that focuses on oil platforms to be reliable. However, you might scrutinize statements stated in sales collateral or by representatives promoting the Russian manufacturer.

Your report should be limited to interviews with people who have had extensive experience with the manufacturer you are considering.

Certain issues are always debatable, and won’t be resolved. Despite the fact that we can easily get verifiable sources and spokespeople who can seemingly make a good case, no volume of reasoning by any expert and no  statistical analysis report will do anything to close a controversial subject. A person’s dissertation that the more government spending will turn around the unemployment problem in America and solve its long-term financial problems cannot be proved. Similarly, one could only argue (more or less effectively), not prove, that more government spending would drive up inflation and lead to a weaker long-term us economy that would after a time be on the verge of collapse. A number of issues are more unsolvable and improvable than others, no matter how reliable the sources.

Granted with these challenges, legal translation services workers should fight the temptation to unsubstantiated results. In fact, it’s considered intelligent to not include any findings than to include potentially misleading findings.

Distinguish Hard from Soft Evidence

Hard evidence is composed of visible facts. The findings can be confirmed from other sources or retested. Soft evidence is made up of uninformed or baseless and ungrounded opinion.

Interpreting Data, Making Valid Conclusions and Using Strong Reasoning

Fully Interpreted Data

Explain the significance of your data. Interpretation is the heart of the analytical report. You might, for example, interpret the training information data this way:

Our customer service staff in India frequently works with people with heavy Southeastern and New England accents, consequently they the customer service staff has a difficult time communicating with clients and clients have a challenging time deciphering what the customer service staff is expressing.  This means that training focused on becoming familiar with accents should be our first requirement in a training program. Despite its effectiveness in other companies, the training we are reviewing may not meet our needs.

By saying “This means … ” you engage in analysis- not simple information gathering. Simply listing your findings is not enough. Spell out the meaning.

Valid Conclusions and Recommendations

A useful conclusion may appeal secondarily to emotion (“You will love this translation company”), but it always appeals primarily to reason (“This translation company will best serve our needs”). When analyzing a controversial topic, try to remain impartial.

Say you work as a Certified Dallas Translation Service and have been asked to study this question: Is the Government of Peru likely to build or expand shipping ports near Lima? Do justice to this topic by making sure your data are complete, your interpretations are not biased by prior opinion, and your conclusions and recommendation are based on the facts.

When you do reach definite conclusions, state them with assurance and authority. Avoid noncommittal statements (“It would seem that . . . “or “It looks as if … “). Be direct (“Without improved and ongoing random testing of NYC translation services workers, risk for errors and poor translations is extremely high”). If, on the other hand, your analysis does not yield a definite conclusion, do not force a simplistic one on your material.

Clear and Careful Reasoning

Report writing is not simply a mechanical process of collecting and recording information. If it were, machines could be programmed for the job. Each step of your analysis requires decisions about what to record, what to exclude, and where to go next. Like a skilled Portuguese translator in Washington, D.C, you should evaluate your data (Is this reliable and important?), interpret your evidence (What does it mean?), and make recommendations based on your conclusions (What action is needed?), you might have to adjust your original plan. You cannot know what you will find until you have searched. Remain flexible enough to revise your plan in the light of new evidence.