Translators Identify And Discuss Non-verbal Communication In The Global Workplace

In the process of communication, people either intentionally and unintentionally send and receive nonverbal signals. As suggested by Washington D.C. translation services workers, this nonverbal communication can strengthen a verbal message (when they are in tune with what is spoken or written), weaken a verbal message (when they are in conflict with it), or substitute verbal communication entirely. For example, you might tell a customer that you will deliver the contracted goods in time, but at the same time you’re forced smile and your nervous behavior will transmit an entirely different message. In fact, nonverbal communication often gives essential information to listeners than the words spoken, especially when they trying to determine their attitude towards an issue or to judge the reliability and the competence of the speaker.

By paying attention to nonverbal cues in the workplace, translators will become better speakers and better listeners thus enhancing the ability to communicate successfully. However, since nonverbal signals you are sending can be both to your advantage and to undermine your verbal message, it is essential to be sure that you are sending the right signals. The professionals from a Houston Translation Services company claim that the following signals generally contribute to building credibility and aptitude for leadership: eye contact, gestures, posture and voice.

Facial expressions, especially eye contact unintentionally reveal the attitude and the true feelings of the speaker. The above mentioned certified translation professionals advise us to maintain direct eye contact, avoiding excessive blinking and not to look down before responding to a question or to look away for a long period of time.

A stiff and immobile body, tense and raised shoulders as well as fidgeting, walking briskly, throat-clearing, tapping one’s fingers or smiling out of context show that you are nervous or uncertain.  As far as vocal characteristics are concerned, the advice of the translation workers is to keep to a conversational style and to avoid sounding flat or tense, speaking too fast or monotonously.

By Sudarsana Sinha

Collaborative Communication

The purpose of team collaboration on various communicationprojectsreports, websites, presentations, and other is to achieve through the collective energy and expertise of the various team members results better than the outcomes each individual could achieve otherwise.

Although it seems and easy task, we should say that collaborating on team messagesis not that simple. It has its own specifics and requires special effort. First, the work habits or priorities of the members of the team may and normally differ: an engineer, for example, would rather focus on accuracy of information and compliance with technical standards; aPR professional would rather pay attention on organizationand coherence; a manager would focus on deadlines, cost, and common organizational goals. Then, the team members also differ in writing styles, background and personality traits, which can also complicate the communication process. In this light, effective communication requires flexibility, honesty and openness to other opinions giving priority to team objectives rather than to pursuing private business goals or imposing “their way” to do things.

In this light, the professionals from a college transcript translation agency give hereafter the following guidelines for collaborative writing: to select carefully collaborators whose experience, background and talent best match the project needs; to agree on and clearly formulate project goals before the start of the project; to define clear individual responsibilities, including their scope and deadlines and other. The translation workers also advise us to avoid writing as a group. In their opinion, the best approach in most cases is to research, discuss and outline the writing as a group, but to assign the development of the text to one person. Of course, you would need to divide larger projects among more writers, but even in this case, Philadelphia Japanese Translation Agency professionals recommend the final revision to be done by one person to ensure consistency of writing.

Effective Cross Functional Teams With Language Translators

As a professional certified translator, you might be tasked with an assignment where you will be working collectively with other professionals to solve a common problem or reach a common goal in a team. The following article discusses some characteristics of teams.

Communications within a cross functional work team symbolize a key aspect of professional communication. A cross functional team consists of individuals who come together with an aim of reaching a common goal.  For instance, it might include purchasing, accounting, marketing and even language translation professionals.  As one Houston Chinese translator explains, cross functional teams are formed in order to identify an effective solution and once a solution is determined and implemented with successful results, the team breaks up. Often the members of these problem solving teams come from a number of business areas, specialties and areas of expertise. The positive aspect of this sort of team is that it brings about a range of viewpoints from people of diverse corporate backgrounds and knowledge. However, the downside can sometimes be that conflicting interests can generate conflicts that require strong skills in professional communication to manage.

Committees are structured teams that tend to exist for an extended period of time and might even become a fixture of the organization. Committees generally have regularly scheduled events such as the meeting of the executive committee and perhaps even elections. Regardless of a team’s objective and responsibility, all members need to have the ability to converse professionally with fellow team members and outsiders. According to several experienced Japanese translation workers in Seattle, this need generally requires more advanced communication skills that include disseminating details and facts with members, being attentive to other members, and composing communications that convey the joint ideas and opinions of the team.

Creating Messages That Draw Attention

Once information passes through the communication channel and is received by the target audience, it encounters an entirely new spectrum of challenges. Realizing the ways the target audience will acquire, decode, and react to the information you communicate will assist Spanish translation workers and interpreters in developing more powerful communications.

How Audiences Acquire Information
When a member of the target audience receives your message, three events had to take place:

1. The audience member had to perceive that a message was being transmitted,
2. The audience member had to choose the message from all other messages vying for attention
3. The audience member had to recognize that this was a real message (as in contrast to accidental, useless sounds).

Listeners in the business world today are like pedestrians that take the subway and walk down busy streets to get to work. They are overwhelmed with the amount of information and sounds that they can ignore or focus attention on. Throughout the next set of blog entries, Seattle Japanese translation workers will discover a number of strategies for creating messages that draw attention. Generally speaking, you should follow these guidelines to improve your likelihood of success:

Take into account your target audience’s needs, desires and presumptions. Provide communications through the media and channels that your target audience is expecting. If co-workers are used to receiving conference announcements sent by email then you shouldn’t suddenly switch to posting announcements in the breakroom or on a company intranet site without informing the intended recipients.

Ensure simplicity. Regardless of whether the target audience needs to hear what you are going to communicate, it’s likely that they will never be exposed to your communication if you make it difficult for them to receive. For instance, poorly designed websites with dark backgrounds and light or bright text and confusing navigation can obstruct your communication from being received by your target audience.

Stress understanding and expertise. Certified translation workers should use` terms, images, and concepts that are utilized by your target audience. For instance, almost all people who visit your firm’s website now count on finding information concerning the business on an “about us” page.

Modern Barriers Of Translated Communications

Within any modern day setting, the communications that you translate or interpret can be disrupted by a variety of communication barriers. Some common modern day barriers include sounds and environmental distractions, competing messages, filters, and channel breakdowns:

Sounds and Environmental Distractions. These types of distractions range from hold, cold or stuffy meeting rooms; to cluttered computer desktops with Skype, Facebook, Twitter, and chat messengers open and Microsoft Outlook reminders constantly going off. The common habit of multitasking, attempting more than one task at a time, is practically guaranteed to create communication distractions. Other distractions that Houston Portuguese to English translation workers have identified can be rather personal such as thoughts and emotions that inhibit the target audience members from receiving and processing the information that you deliver.

Competing messages. Getting the complete attention from all of the intended audience members is very challenging and usually impossible.  A skilled translator with The Marketing Analysts Translation Services company is ready to avert other messages that interfere with your message.  Cell phones, other audience members and even fellow certified translation workers maybe more captivating than the message you deliver and can divert attention.

Filters. Filters can be human or electronic and work to blocked or distort your message.  Certain filters, such as spam filters are sometimes unintentional.  Even if you are a veteran certified transcript and diploma translation worker, you are likely aware how a structure and culture of certain business clients deter the stream of critical job related details.

Channel breakdowns. There are moments when inherent weaknesses in the communication channel completely fail when delivering your message. A computer that you had planned to complete a translation and e-mail it to your client becomes infected by a virus or the server that you use to host your blog crashes and cuts off access.

As a professional translator, make a special effort to recognize barriers that can creep up and stop your communications from reaching their intended audiences.

Learning About the Job Market For Translation Workers

Once you have performed some background research and produced a comprehensive account of your competencies, aptitudes, concerns, and needs and wants, start learning about your career choices. In order to know how to respond to job trends, Detroit Chinese translation workers suggest that you start your hunt early. Make an effort by paying attention to these recommendations:

1. Starting in your sophomore year, start browsing the local and online job boards: many local newspapers still publish Help Wanted sections in their Sunday editions. Listed here will be job descriptions, wages, and requirements for many work opportunities.

2. Talk to a librarian and ask her to recommend occupational outlooks, industry or trade publications, websites, and magazines or journals in your discipline.

3. Go to your university’s career and placement office; job postings are listed there, interviews are planned, and advisers can offer useful tips regarding job hunting.

4. Contact individuals in your line of business to get an inside view and some useful guidance.

5. Register in your career and placement office for job interviews with business representatives who have announced campus visits.

6. Request the recommendations of professors who do professional consulting or who have worked in business, industry, or government.

7. Be on the lookout for an internship in your discipline; this experience may count more than your education.

8. Develop connections; avoid being scared to ask for guidance. Write down names, titles, phone numbers, e-mail addresses, and addresses of individuals ready to assist you.

9. A lot of professional organizations offer student memberships at reduced fees. These types of organizations can produce outstanding contacts and look good on your resume. If you do join a professional organization, try to attend meetings of the local chapter.

By following these recommendations before you graduate and begin your job search, you might discover particular classes cause you to be more valuable to prospective employers. In numerous jobs, for instance such as in the professional certified translation field, a solid understanding of layout and design applications is attractive, particular human resources positions call for counseling experience, and so on. Master as many skills as possible and customize your last semester to these mastering these demands (enrolling in a few layout and design application classes, taking a few counseling classes and performing volunteer work for a non-government agency (NGO).

If you happen to be transitioning from one job to another or one career to another, prospective hiring managers will be more intrigued in what you’ve done in your years since graduation. Be ready to present the way your experience is applicable to the new German translator job. Take advantage of the contacts you have built over time.

Parts of A Report

Introduction. The introduction explains and states the problem or condition, and offers background information. Define the target audience and go over your sources of information, in addition to your purpose for not including particular information such as expert opinions and relevant data. Dallas Chinese translation workers recommend  that you state working definitions, except in cases where there are so many that a glossary is required. In case you use a glossary and appendices, refer to them in your introduction. Lastly, establish the scope of your report by detailing the important concepts covered in the body.

Body. The body separates an elaborate issue into connected topics and subtopics, positioned in order of their significance. Break up the subject into its key components and then the key components into into subparts. Several New York French translation workers suggest that authors continue to break up the subject matter in order to simplify it and make sense of the topic. For example, if your major topic is “Common Problems Reported In New Automobiles”, you might break this down into a number of subtopics:  “Engine troubles” and “Non Engine troubles”.  The second subtopic can be divided into a number of sub-subtopics including “broken interior components”, “non-working electrical issues” and perhaps even “after sales service”.  These divisions and subdivisions prevent the author from getting off track and assists readers in following the analysis.  It’s critical that based on your logic and analysis that your audience can draw conclusions that are the same as your own. Good research necessitates the inclusion of all feasible issues and reduces the focus from possible to certain causes. Sort, assess, and decipher information to attain a logical conclusion. The course of action could be outlined like the following:

  1. Define and Assess all Feasible Factors, and Reject the Improbable Ones
  2. Choose the Most Likely Reasons and Assess Them
  3. Determine the specific (or Direct Causes)

Conclusion. The conclusion will likely be in the most interesting section for the majority of readers since it provides answers to the questions that the audience had initially. As a result, many reports these days offer the conclusion just after the introduction and body section.

Here you review, decipher, and suggest. Even though you have evaluated information at every stage of your research, your summary brings everything together in a wider understanding and recommends specific strategies. One Kansas City translation worker recommends that the final section be considered in three ways:

  1. The summary must correctly mirror the body of the report.
  2. The general meaning that you present needs to be congruent with the results reported in the summary.
  3. The suggestion needs to be in line with the research purpose, the proof offered, and the explanation provided.

The summary and explanation needs to be intelligently linked to your suggestions.

Avoiding Specious Reasoning

Specious reasoning is misleading since it seems correct at first, but fails to standup to careful analysis.  Thoughts grounded on non-authoritative judgments and random guessing are often considered specious.  Inferences that were developed speciously flop when carefully scrutinized.

Assume, for example, you are Portuguese Translation Manager at a global manufacturing company.  The president of your company has directed you to evaluate the reliability of pre-employment evaluation testing of workers in Portugal and Brazil as a measure of intellect and as an indicator of future employee success. Going over the evidence that you gathered, you discover a strong positive correlation between below average pre-employment evaluation scores and low achievers. After doing so, you substantiate your findings by evaluating and analyzing a solid cross section of trustworthy information sources. Once you substantiate your findings, you determine that you are prepared to conclude that pre-employment evaluation tests are reliable measures of intelligence and predict future employee performance. Unfortunately, your analysis would be misleading unless you could show that:

  1. Only candidates for jobs having a high potential for promotion were given pre-employment tests
  2. Candidates in Portugal and Brazil had later been exposed to the exact same training curriculum at a similar pace.

It’s important for translation services workers to understand that even hard facts are sometimes used to support faulty reasoning.  The data that is gathered must be interpreted correctly, objectively, and within a context that accounts for unforeseen variables.

Identifying The Problem, Avoiding Bias and Including Accurate Data

Clearly Identified Problem or Question
Fully understand what you’re seeking. If shipment to china that was scheduled to be delivered last Tuesday and it is now Friday, you might want to check if the order ever left the warehouse facility before you call the representative of the shipping company that your firm uses into your office. You should take a logical, step-by-step approach to the development of your report too.

Earlier, a hypothetical employer posed this question: “Will on the job pronounciation and pronunciation language training for our customer service staff in India help reduce compliants among our clients?” The research question obviously requires answers to three other questions: What are the real benefits that companies have reported by instituting on the job pronounciation and pronunciation language training? Are the reports by these companies valid? Will language training offered by Miami German translation companies work in our situation? How pronounciation and pronunciation language training got started, how prevalent is it, who uses it, and other such questions aren’t pertinent to this problem, although some background might be useful in the report’s introduction. As Always, writers and language consultants with French translation services in Houston  recommend that you begin by defining clearly the central questions and thinking through any subordinate questions they may imply. Only then can you determine the data or evidence you need.

Having formalized the core set of questions, the writer of the report can formulate her statement of purpose:
This report examines some of the claims about pronounciation and pronunciation language training benefits made by practitioners of pronounciation and pronunciation language training.
The writer might have mistakenly begun instead with this statement:
This report examines pronounciation and pronunciation language training.

Notice how the first version sharpens the focus by expressing the precise subject: pronounciation and pronunciation language training (a huge topic), but the alleged benefits of pronounciation and pronunciation language training.
As a rule, Seattle German Translation Services suggest that you define the purpose by condensing your approach to a basic question: Does pronounciation and pronunciation language training have therapeutic benefits? or, Why have our sales dropped steadily for three months? Then restate the question as a declarative sentence in your purpose statement.

A Report with No Bias
Interpret evidence impartially. Stay on track by beginning with an unbiased title. Consider these two title versions:
THE ACCURACY OF AUTOMATED TRANSLATION APPLICATIONS IN LAW
AN ANALYSIS OF THE ACCURACY OF AUTOMATED TRANSLATION APPICATIONS IN LAW
The first version suggests the report simply will discuss the the accuracy of automated translation software. Here, the application’s accuracy is a foregone conclusion. In contrast, the second version signals readers that the report will analyze whether the automated translation software is in fact accurate.

Accurate and Adequate Data
Never alter original data by refusing to take into account important opinions and observations. Imagine that you’re asked to recommend the production equipments for a manufacturer. After inviting several manufacturer’s representatives, you stumble upon a cases study:

Of the six manufacturers that you are considering, only two had had client approval ratings above 80%. In addition, the same company had the fastest equipment installation times and lowest cost of maintenance. If you cite these data, present both points, not simply the first. Reserve personal comments or judgments for your conclusion. As space permits, include the full text of interviews or questionnaires in appendices

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Grammar, Punctuation, and Spelling: Nuisance or Necessity?

The mechanical issues of grammar, punctuation, and spelling are more important in a global economy than they have ever before been, perhaps with the exception of the work of an early Christian epistle writer or medieval scribe who believed he was committing the Word of God to velum, papyrus, paper or other medium.  Today, however, because our world is so inter-dependent, some people trust an electronic application for their professional translation services needs and for quick communication.

These applications require standard spelling, grammar, and punctuation to translate meaning and structure from one language to another.  Text with illogical sentence structure, incorrect grammar and /or spelling, and absent, misplaced, or incorrect punctuation cannot convey sense, accuracy, or logic to the reader of the electronic translation.

Thus, for all practical purposes, the electronic translation is useless at best and dangerous at worst.  If useless, the skills of a competent human certified translator are required.  If time is critical and a competent human translator is not available, a sale may be lost, a diplomatic mission stymied, or a strategic meeting missed.

As is the case in all writing, good writing depends on the writer’s knowledge and skill–including expertise in grammar, punctuation, and spelling–not on the reader’s imagination or genius to unravel the meaning of a translation from a flawed source.