Group Dynamics – 2. Phases of Group Development

On their way to becoming a cohesive team and reaching their objectives groups generally go through a number of stages such as orientation, conflict, brainstorming, emergence and reinforcement.

The first stage in becoming a cohesive team is the orientation (formation) stage. During this stage team members socialize, get to know each other, establish their roles and responsibilities and develop a sense of common purpose. Unfortunately, as the workers from a Portuguese translation service comment, teams cannot start working smoothly from the very beginning, so after this fairly short stage, they begin to discuss their positions, their roles and the function of leadership. This is known as the conflict (storming) stage. As team members share their ideas, disagreement and tension natural arise among members. In fact during this stage conflict has not been identified yet, it is rather a stage so it can be characterized as a phase of chaos and disorganization. The Chinese translators mentioned above underline that it is important to encourage open communication during this stage so that team members can speak up and fully discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the various options to resolve conflict issues during the next, the brainstorming (norming) stage. It is at the end of this stage when team members establish their roles, take responsibility and formulate standards. Yan Linski, a German to English transation professional, adds that although group brainstorming is a highly popular activity, in some cases it may be more productive to have people brainstorm individually and then to discuss them at a group meeting.

Some teams never reach the emergence (performing) phase because they have not resolved their internal problems. However, if they do, they find a solution supported by all members (even if not all of them fully agree that it is the best one).

During the reinforcement stage, members receive their assignments and they take steps to perform them.

By Margarita Mihaylova

How Translators Can Use Brainstorming For Conducting Research And Strategic Planning

Sometimes as a translation worker, you will be asked by a client to conduct a simple research project to gain information about product applications, technical details or even consumer usage behavior in a foreign country. One of the first steps in finding and collecting the information needed to accomplish the objectives of the project is to survey the information your client already has on hand. If the topic is one that you or your client is experienced with, it’s possible that you will already have enough knowledge to complete the task. Often times, it is more likely that the topic will be unfamiliar to you or that your own knowledge is inadequate to address the objective without more information.

Creative Thinking and Brainstorming

Before jumping head first into your assignment, The Marketing Analysts Translations Company recommends that you document what you already understand about the area of interest. Take advantage of a technique called creative thinking or brainstorming. In brainstorming, you organize thoughts and evaluate them in an manner that becomes increasingly organized and targeted. At first, make a note of anything that enters your mind that is related to the topic. The emphasis should be placed on being as creative as possible. After doing so, you can evaluate your thoughts for practicality, usefulness, efficiency and other criteria. Many Washington D.C. French to English translators will either write their thoughts down in a notebook, type them out on their computers, or even make use of special brainstorming software applications. By making use of the brainstorming approach, can begin to pinpoint and evaluate the information that is available to you and the data that you will need to collect.

As an undergraduate student or in your professional work experience, you make have already taken part in some sort of brainstorming planning. Some ways that you may have used it could have included coming up with a strategy to translate a large book, developing a plan to coordinate the activities of team of translators to meet an urgent deadline, or even plan a large simultaneous interpreting event for one of your clients. Although brainstorming and creative thinking techniques were created for use by small-teams, anyone can apply the techniques of brainstorming on their own to make a topic easier to understand. To help your brainstorming activities and, afterwards, to assess the outcome and effectiveness, make use of the information you produced regarding the requirements and perceptions of your client. The following questions are a few that could come up in your brainstorming session.