Going Global With Your Business Website

Translation Services for global business

The world is getting smaller by the hour, and it is more and more difficult to succeed in the global economy. There are literally thousands of options and directions to take; there is more information than ever before- more than can be consumed. With new markets, new ideas and new trends, it is difficult to reach potential customers and run a successful business. Before you set off into the world of global business, there are six things you should do.

1. Have a clear, strong plan.

When it comes to global business, the power of analytics is tremendous. Decide on your primary goal. There is absolutely no time to waste. The world is changing at jet speed, and you have to stay in the game. Steer clear of blurred ideas, mixed up plans and unreliable information. Stay focused and work on achieving your dreams.

2. Be aware of competition.

Competition is out there, whether you like it or not, and it will hit hard. You might experience all kinds of things: someone copying your words, setting traps for you, embracing your current customers, etc. It will be a rat race, but that is how things go, and there is no time to brood on it. Make the best of your situation and head towards success.

3. Localize your site.

Meet the cultural norms of a market you are about to reach, and make sure your website is translated into several languages, depending on the region you target. By translating your web site, you will increase the chances of success by 70-80%. English is not the supreme Internet language anymore; you have to broaden your scope of influence. Also, proper keyword placement will make sure your site is picked up by search engines.

4. Follow the trends.

The most important thing is not to stay behind with the times. Stay in tune with the latest in design and check on everything that is currently happening in the online market. You never know what you might come across. Expand; go beyond what is popular and interesting. Offer discounts and incentives. This way, you will give your customers and visitors something to look forward to.

5. Have a strong social media presence.

Having a website is not enough anymore. You have to include social media buttons on your site, and make sure your customers are able to “share” anything they like. This will make you closer to thousands of people and enable you to draw many potential customers. Know that some countries do not use Facebook (Russia, for example), so be sure to include buttons for all major social networks.  Consider providing the Spanish, German, Portuguese, Chinese and French translation of your popular content.

6. Make your web design shine.

It is all about the appearance and ease of use, so you have to pay attention to your website’s design and functionality. Keep it simple, yet interesting and engaging. Remember that the design should go well with your web content and the overall appeal of your site (funny, serious, casual, etc.). Choose the colors wisely and follow the latest trends and templates.

Once you cover all that we have mentioned, there’s no doubt your website will maintain a strong global presence and attract plenty of customers. Your job is to lay down the groundwork.

How Translators Should Use The Power Of Persuasion By Including Facts And Data

As content creators, writers and translators who are trying to include persuasion in our works, it’s important to keep in mind that the people who will be reading the material can be classified into groups.  They include those who have been persuaded, those who can be persuaded and those who cannot be persuaded.  Therefore, Washington D.C. Legal Translation providers suggest that we should be cautious about how we use persuasion to sway the group that can be persuaded and be delicate in how we address those who are already persuaded.  You will never be able to change the mindset of those who cannot be persuaded.  As far as those who are already persuaded, it might be enough to demonstrate why you are a reliable source of information and then make your emotional appeal.  For those who can be persuaded, you need to present proof and data to support your position.

In a commercial sales presentation, one sales representative might state a negative claim against the competition to persuade the key decision makers that the product they offer is inferior.  A Portuguese Miami translator  translator suggests that the back and forth debate might sound something like this:

• Brand X’s product lacks the software scalability to address your needs in six months.

• Brand Y’s product has one of the worst support teams in the world.

• Brand X’s product has a tendency to crash because it is new and hasn’t been adequately field tested.

On the other hand, a positive argument is one that reinforces the person making the claim with encouraging statements.

• The product line we represent has been field tested in thousands of installations.

• With the software that operates on our computers, you can expect efficiency gains of 20%.

It’s likely that there won’t be many members in your audience who will feel that you are trying to deceive them by offering incorrect data. More likely than not, Seattle French translation workers suggest that the facts won’t concern the audience as much as matters they relate to value, importance, and the possible fallout from making a bad decision. The largest part of your presentation should be devoted to clarifying the implications and meanings of the material you presented. In other words, as your audience takes in all of the information that you presented, they will want to know what it all means and why it is important to them.