Translation And Copyright–What The Law Says?

It is important to explain what copyright means before we proceed with establishing a connection between copyright and translation. Copyright means that any content or book or music which is your creation is rightfully yours. The author of the original content holds the right to publish, sell, distribute copies, get his work translated or to carry out an enactment of the content he has written. He also can prevent other people from doing the same and the law will be on his side. Copyright laws are made by every country to safeguard the rights of the original authors.

Copyright laws were made, so that people who try to sell or publish or make copies of someone else’s original content can be brought to justice. Piracy is a huge problem which today’s world is facing. Original books, articles, music or lyrics are stolen by pirates. Lots of original content available on the internet is spun by writers everyday. Therefore laws were made to protect the original works of authors and musicians etc. Even the translation of a work, published without the permission of its original author and its translator is unlawful and illegal. Unauthorized publication or use of an original piece of work can be challenged by the author in any court of law.

The language translator who translates the original content of any writer owns the copyright as well. When a translator is asked to translate a content by the author (who owns the copyright), he himself creates something original and new. This implies that an original English to German translation carried out by a German translator will have its copyright too. Copyright laws vary a little from country to country. Translations done in South Korea from Korean to English will be protected by the law of South Korea. The country in which a translator translates some content is liable for providing copyright protection to the work of the translator. A translator himself is an original writer of the translated version and is considered as such.

It is the decision of the translator to sign away his translation or not. Often translators give up their copyright ownership. Its a personal choice of a translator to do away with the copyright ownership of his work or to claim it. But it might be a little bit different for the translators who work for translation services companies. It depends on what was mentioned on the contract when the translator signed it with the translation agency. But in most cases, its the translator who owns the copyright since he/she is the original creator of the translated content.

Translation and copyright have a close relation with each other. Only few people know that a translator holds the status of second author of the original piece. Even the translator who finally reviews the translated version before it reaches the client, owns the copyright too.

Setting Up A New Business In Africa – Impact Of Translation Services

cape_town_business_tanslationSouth Africa has a prosperous business front. The introduction of certified translation services has slowly brought upon a revolution in the South African business industry. According to the New Companies Act introduced in the country in 2011, the three most common business structures now allowed here are sole proprietor, close corporation and private company.

Sole proprietor simply means the “sole trader” wherein you start trading for yourself. This is by far the simplest form of a business setup and does not require much effort on the part of the entrepreneur. The business is run by one single individual only and there are no legal distinctions. Close Corporation (known as CC) on the other hand could have been a good opportunity for investment but for new starters in South Africa, this is no longer an option. No new Close Corporations are being registered in the country.

For beginning entrepreneurs wishing to start their businesses in South Africa, private company setup is by far the best option. It involves the creation of a new identity of the person or the company in order to commence trading or business. Trading through an established company gives you an upper hand. It provides you with a better professional image while simultaneously running things in a proper way and following the prescribed business laws of the country. All you need to do to start a new business is to register yourself with the South African government for income tax and other necessary licensing.

However, there are some common problems in the initiation of a business setup that new entrepreneurs are faced with in South Africa. Doing business in Africa has its own form of hurdles and challenges. For instance, in South Africa, the greatest problem for business entrepreneurs is a lack of electricity. Another problem faced in South Africa by foreign investors is the barrier of communication due to language complexities. Most of the hurdles faced by investors are language related. Although English is widely spoken in the country, the majority of South African people are not adequately proficient in conversing in the language and businesses must rely on professional translation services such as those offered by The Marketing Analysts.

The solution to this problem is the establishment of more legal translation services all around the African country to facilitate the communication between foreign and local investors. These translation services will greatly help to promote the business sector in Africa. Providing better translation services will further improve business communication in South Africa.