Developing Marketing Strategies For Entering Foreign Markets

Businesses that decided to enter foreign markets often discover that their products and strategies require a certain degree of customization. Changes to the products and promotional strategies are often needed to address a wide variety of issues that that are present in foreign markets and that might not be present in domestic markets. Therefore, a winning strategy requires careful research and planning to ensure that the needs of the market will be addressed from the offset. Upfront planning can help ensure success and avert costly cross cultural, political, legal and regulatory, and competitive mishaps.

Sociocultural Forces

Certified translators frequently hear stories about companies that made the mistake of ignoring cultural, social and linguistic differences when entering foreign markets. An essential requirement of an effective global marketing strategy is the ability to accurately define and identify significant sociocultural and sociolinguistic deviations. In Hong Kong, for example, McDonald’s offers a number of items that appeal to local tastes such as the Green Tea & Red Bean Ice Cream Sundae. In Thailand, McDonald’s offers the Samurai Pork Burger, which happens to be marketed as the Shogun Burger in China. In India, McDonald’s caters to local tastes with a menu that is spicier and includes chicken instead of beef.

Cultural and linguistic difference and preferences can be difficult to identify and integrate into strategies. As many Portuguese translators are aware, while Portuguese is spoken in Portugal, Brazil and Angola, there are significant differences and advertising and other promotional content must be translated into other languages. Therefore, a proper localization strategy requires the use of translators who are fluent in the local dialect. Localization must also account for any logos, symbols or trademarks that could have a cultural meaning. Gerber made the mistake of selling its baby food in low literacy countries. In the countries, products packaging includes a picture of the food item. However, Gerber products include a picture of a baby which confused illiterate consumers. It was widely reported that some shoppers thought that Gerber was selling baby meat.

Tips For Writing An Excellent Research Report

Formal reports offer solutions, answer questions and solve problems. The practice of data analysis entails the careful collection and evaluation of facts that you gather from various sources and use as evidence to formulate judgments and produce solutions. During the course of planning your report, Atlanta German translation workers suggest that you spend times thinking about which of these questions your analysis is meant to answer:

l. Will taking a specific action reach a specific objective?

2. Is solution A or solution B a better cure for a certain condition?

3. What causes a certain condition to occur?

4. Is a given solution useful in a particular scenario?

Shorten your strategy for answering a research question and recast it as a declarative sentence in your statement of purpose. Occasionally you will work with a combination of approaches.

Once the research problem or question is defined, the next step is to analyze the facts without bias so that legitimate conclusions are made. At every phase of the project, Portland Spanish translation workers suggest that researchers give special consideration regarding the type of information record, what to leave out, what to discard and what you need next.

While you sort through information and create your report, only use the most reputable and reliable resources, differentiate hard from soft facts, and avoid specious reasoning. Adhere to these techniques as you plan and write your report:

l. Keep these questions with you and refer back to them at numerous points in your study.

a. What am I specifically seeking?

b. How should I structure my research questions to acquire the data that I need?

c. What is the best approach to communicate my results to the target audience?

Stay adaptable enough to adjust your style as you progress in your study.

2. Create a thorough outline and produce your report from it.

a. In your introduction, describe the topic of the report, explain and identify the research problem or question, and summarize important historical information. Determine your target audience, and briefly go over the sources and reasons for excluding data. Include working definitions or include them in a glossary. If you create a glossary or appendices, discuss its existence. Lastly, mention all significant issues to be covered in your body.

b. In the body section of the report, separate your subject into major topics and related subtopics. As recommended by Milwaukee translation workers, you should continue to split up the topic as much as possible in order to keep the topic easy to understand. In every stage of division, specify the topic, mention your relevant results, and assess and decipher the findings.

c. In the conclusion, review the most significant results from the body section, clarify the meaning of your results, and make recommendations according to your findings.

CONCLUSION: EXTEMPORANEOUS REPORTS

Here are a few final recommendations that were provided by language translation workers to help you get the most out of your presentation.

Be Concise

Say what you came to say; then summarize and close- politely and on time. As one Spanish translator in Houston explained, don’t punctuate your speech with clever digressions that pop into your head. Unless a specific anecdote was part of your original plan to clarify a point or increase interest, avoid digressions. Remember that each of us often finds what we have to say more interesting than our listeners do.

Summarize

Before ending, take a moment to summarize the major points and to reemphasize anything of special importance.

Leave Time for Questions and Answers

As you begin, inform your audience that a question-and-answer period will follow. Announce a specific time limit (such as ten minutes) to avoid public debates. Then you can end the session gracefully without making anyone feel cut off or excluded from the discussion. A French translator in Washington D.C. suggests that if you can’t answer a question, say so, and move to the next question. End the session by saying “We have time for one more question,” or some similar limiting signal.

Plan and Practice

Planning and practice make oral reports effective. As in writing, control is central. On a basic level, just filling a page with words can be called writing. Similarly, the mere utterance of intelligible sounds can be called speaking. The effective speaker, however, communicates with confidence, sophistication, and purpose. As with all skills, practice- and more practice- makes perfect. Therefore, instead of avoiding public speaking opportunities, seek them out.

How To Write A Message More Efficiently And Save The Audience’s Time

Saves the target audience’s time
Aside from appearing more convincing, well-organized communications are productive; they fulfill the recipient’s demand for usefulness. Anytime a letter is well structured, it includes just the most pertinent details, to ensure the target recipients won’t spend precious resources on details that are unnecessary. Many New York Italian Translation workers believe that strong organization is the root of being concise and exact in writing. The entire message must present details in the logical place. The message recipient must be able to move through the thought pattern without having difficulty. Furthermore, when the organization is clear and arranged intelligently, the message recipients can conserve substantially more time, if they need to, by seeking out only the details they need instead of reading every little point.

Simplifies the writer’s task
Last but not least, Philadelphia Translation workers claim that offering a well-organized message makes sense since it aids you with getting your message down in writing faster and easier. This is a critical element in commerce, in which the goal is to complete a job, not to generate another message. The truth is, once the presidents in the research mentioned previously were asked what skills they wanted to strengthen in their professional writing, they stated faster composition speed more frequently than other aspects.

When you give adequate thought concerning what you’re planning to express and the way you’re going to express it prior to starting, you are able to move forward with greater assurance. The draft should be completed a more swiftly since you will no longer spend time placing your thoughts in bad places or crafting content that isn’t necessary. Furthermore, you are able to apply your organizational plan to obtain feedback from your manager to ensure that you are following the right course prior to investing resources composing a draft. And if you happen to be completing a complicated task, you can evoke your organizational strategy to split the composition between co-workers in an effort to complete the project as fast as possible.

A Summary For Translators And Writers Of Proposals

Before concluding this section on proposals, we thought we would provide a summary of the posts that we have made on this subject.  To start, most Washington D.C. translation workers define a proposal as an offer to do something or a suggestion for some action. Among the various types of proposals that can be generated, there are three main types that consist of the planning proposal, the research proposal, and the sales proposal. Among these various types, they can take the form of an internal proposal, an external proposal, a solicited proposal or an unsolicited proposal.

A Houston Portuguese Translation profession explains the differences between the three main types of proposal using the following clarification.  A planning proposal is typically written and translated to address the benefits of following a suggestion for change.  Alternatively, a research proposal tends to explain why a research project would be valuable to an organization.  In doing so, the research proposal must explain why the researcher is qualified to carry out the project and identify the likelihood of its success.  Finally, the sales proposal should be written to explain why your client can do a better job at fulfilling the needs of the customer better than a competitor.  Regardless of the type of proposal, a well written one will answer the necessary questions concerning what, why, how, when, and how much.

To ensure a good proposal, several professional Atlanta translation workers offer the following suggestion:

l. Use the appropriate format and supplements.
2. Be sure that your subject is focused and your purpose worthwhile.
3. Identify all related problems.
4. Offer realistic methods.
5. Provide concrete and specific information.
6. Use visuals whenever possible.
7. Maintain the appropriate level of technicality.
8. Create a tone that connects with your readers.

As you plan to write your proposal, work from a detailed outline that has a distinct introduction, body, and conclusion:

I. In the introduction, answer the what and why and clarify the subject, background, and purpose of your proposal. Establish need and benefits, along with your qualifications. Identify data sources, any limitations of your plan, and its scope.
2. In the body, answer the how, when, and how much. Spell out your plan by enumerating methods, work schedules, materials and equipment, personnel, facilities, costs, expected results, and feasibility.
3. In the conclusion, summarize key points and stimulate action.

Preparing and Translating Proposals that Plan An Improvement

A planning proposal suggests ways to solve a problem or to bring about improvement. Many Washington D.C. Translation Services companies are familiar with writing and translating proposals that take the form of a request for funding to expand the manufacturing output, an architectural plan for new office building on a corporate campus, or a plan to improve leadership training and skills in a major corporation. In every case, the successful planning proposal answers this central question for readers: What are the benefits of following your suggestions? The following planning proposal is external and solicited.

Disappointed with the results of earlier, in-house software development initiatives, a division of Exxon Mobil has contracted a team of software developers to design results-oriented workforce management application. The authors of the proposal worked with a Houston Translation Services company to to persuade decision makers in 3 countries that their plans for software development are likely to be completed faster, more efficiently and produce better results than prior approaches, which were not give enough priority. In their proposal, addressed to the director of the division, the consultants offer concrete and specific solutions to clearly identified problems.

After a brief introduction summarizing the problem, the proposal writers develop their proposal under two major headings (“Assessment of Needs” and “Proposed Plan”) to give the audience a clear forecast of the contents. Under “Proposed Plan,” subheadings offer an even more specific forecast.

The “Limitations” section shows that our plan is careful to promise no more than what will realistically be delivered. At Exxon Mobil, upper management resistance seems to underlie most other problems. Because this ultimate problem apparently has gone unrecognized, the final head, “Related Problems,” is inserted for emphasis.

Because this proposal is external, it can be cast as a certified translation of a letter. Notice, however, that the complimentary closing (“Best wishes”), and word choice (“thanks;” “what we’re doing on our end;” “Michael and Howard,” etc.) create an informal, familiar tone. Such a tone is appropriate in this particular external document because the writers and reader have spent many hours in planning conferences, luncheons, and phone conversations.

Like any document that gains reader acceptance, this one should be the result of careful decisions about content, organization, and style.

Understanding and Translating Proposals

Despite their variety, most Atlanta Translation workers find that the proposals that they are tasked with translating can be classified in three ways, according to origin, audience, or intention.

Based on its origin, a proposal is either solicited or unsolicited, that is, requested by someone or initiated on your own because you have recognized a need. International business and government proposals are most often solicited and originate from a customer’s request.  Once the request is approved, a purchasing manager invites companies to submit proposals.

Based on its audience, a proposal may be internal or external, that is, written for members of your organization or clients and funding agencies. Based on its intention, a proposal may be a planning, research, or sales proposal. These last categories by no means account for all variations among proposals.  In fact, certain proposals may fall under all three categories, but these are the types you will most likely have to write. Each type will be discussed in upcoming blog entries.

Translators Warn About Overdoing Localization

Though the benefits of embracing and developing a localization strategy to a foreign lifestyle are clear, it can be overdone. A firm should realize that there are actually boundaries that a localization strategy should not step outside in order to accommodate a foreign market.

Base on the opinions of a few some Chicago Russian Translation professionals in localization organizations, there are good reasons to avoid localization tactics all together. For one thing, it is imperative that you recognize that when a country is prepared for change, an alternative way of life could very well be desirable. This is easiest to see in the formerly Soviet Union. Russians want real Americans, not tailored editions. They can undertake the adaptation on their own and count on the “genuine thing.” The politically ordered adjustments in these countries have worn away the old norms and have established new ways. Here, seeking to conform will be an error, because the market wants a product from a profitable international culture. Thus, it is important that the strategic planning team manager to understand the historical and human perspective in which the organization’s promotional transactions are taking place.

Yet Houston French Translation workers suggest that in many cases, localization and adaptation strategies for other cultures can easily seem shallow and lack substance and sincerity. Essentially, it creates the same effect as flattery, by being vulnerable to misinterpretation and suspicion. Conversely, a business that wants to be successful in foreign must present a genuine appearance. Yet, companies that become too concerned with localization can often find it hard to be transparent, trustworthy, and spontaneous. For these companies, it becomes simple lose their bearings.

In the long run, adaptation to the customer’s culture, while a fine touch, should never interfere with the innate merits of the proposition. The thought that one should let personal likes and dislikes influence a business partnership, so popular in the very first discussions of European, Japanese, and even American trade, has been deemed inefficient in the open competition in international markets.