Tips For Writing An Excellent Research Report

Formal reports offer solutions, answer questions and solve problems. The practice of data analysis entails the careful collection and evaluation of facts that you gather from various sources and use as evidence to formulate judgments and produce solutions. During the course of planning your report, Atlanta German translation workers suggest that you spend times thinking about which of these questions your analysis is meant to answer:

l. Will taking a specific action reach a specific objective?

2. Is solution A or solution B a better cure for a certain condition?

3. What causes a certain condition to occur?

4. Is a given solution useful in a particular scenario?

Shorten your strategy for answering a research question and recast it as a declarative sentence in your statement of purpose. Occasionally you will work with a combination of approaches.

Once the research problem or question is defined, the next step is to analyze the facts without bias so that legitimate conclusions are made. At every phase of the project, Portland Spanish translation workers suggest that researchers give special consideration regarding the type of information record, what to leave out, what to discard and what you need next.

While you sort through information and create your report, only use the most reputable and reliable resources, differentiate hard from soft facts, and avoid specious reasoning. Adhere to these techniques as you plan and write your report:

l. Keep these questions with you and refer back to them at numerous points in your study.

a. What am I specifically seeking?

b. How should I structure my research questions to acquire the data that I need?

c. What is the best approach to communicate my results to the target audience?

Stay adaptable enough to adjust your style as you progress in your study.

2. Create a thorough outline and produce your report from it.

a. In your introduction, describe the topic of the report, explain and identify the research problem or question, and summarize important historical information. Determine your target audience, and briefly go over the sources and reasons for excluding data. Include working definitions or include them in a glossary. If you create a glossary or appendices, discuss its existence. Lastly, mention all significant issues to be covered in your body.

b. In the body section of the report, separate your subject into major topics and related subtopics. As recommended by Milwaukee translation workers, you should continue to split up the topic as much as possible in order to keep the topic easy to understand. In every stage of division, specify the topic, mention your relevant results, and assess and decipher the findings.

c. In the conclusion, review the most significant results from the body section, clarify the meaning of your results, and make recommendations according to your findings.

Be Flexible When Planning and Writing Your Research Report

In order to ensure your report meets the objectives that you established from the beginning, it’s important that you adhere to a set of guidelines as you move from planning to writing the formal report.

Remain Flexible

While you are searching and locating sources useful in supporting your research objectives, new findings will lead you in different directions depending on what you find at each step in your investigation process.  Because you will be actively writing, updating and changing your report while investigating new potential sources of information, you will want guidelines to keep you focused on answering your research objective.  The following list is a set of questions that one French translator has compiled to help those working on research projects.  Throughout your project, you should look back and review these questions:

  1. What type of information do I need and why do I need it?
  2. How should I phrase my questions to ensure that right information is collected?
  3. How should I structure my presentation to communicate my process of inquiry and my findings?

As a certified translation worker, you should review these questions regularly during your project and you should be aware that your answers to them may change over time.  At the offset, the first question is answered by the research purpose.  The second question will be phrased in each of your research questions and serve as the blueprint for your report.  The third question will be answered by your outline.  During the research process, a respected Seattle German translation worker suggests that you need allow enough flexibility to allow modifications to your plan in case of unanticipated discoveries.

The following are some examples:

  1. Just as you think your research report is nearly finished, you discover new variables that had not been identified in your statement of purpose.  As a result, you now need to adjust your statement of research purpose to include the new variables.
  2. You decide that certain issues that hadn’t been included in you should now be included or learn that critical information on one of research questions is unavailable. As a result, your research plan needs to be reworked.
  3. While composing your initial draft, you determine that the organization is very poor and needs to be restructured. As a result, you come up with a new outline.

Keep in mind that your finished report will be the summation of many decisions and revisions.  Always remain flexible and be prepared to revise and reshuffle as often as necessary.